The International Boxing Association Executive Committee has concluded two days of meetings in the Uzbekistan capital of Tashkent, discussing key achievements including the outcome of the latest meeting with WBA President in Vargas, and looking ahead to the Rio 2016 Olympic Games and beyond.

First of all, I would like to thank the Uzbekistan Boxing Federation for hosting this important gathering of the AIBA Executive Committee,” said AIBA President Dr Ching-Kuo Wu. “It has been a historic twelve months for our organisation, during which we have witnessed the continued growth of all AIBA boxing competitions, the wide adoption of the HeadsUp charter and the important changes to the AIBA statute that now allows every pro-boxer the opportunity to represent their country at the Olympic Games. The strong support of the Executive Committee members is vital to the development of our sport and they have all agreed with the recent discussions with WBA.”

Since June of last year, changes in senior management have helped AIBA deliver a new era of governance based firmly around greater transparency, stronger collaboration with both its National Federations and Confederations and the implementation of its new procedures already underway.

The AIBA Executive Committee also decided to approve the appointment of Mr Sherzod Tashmatov, Uzbek National Boxing Federation Vice-President, as one of the Asian Confederation representatives on the AIBA Executive Committee.

Additionally, the AIBA Executive Committee reiterates its strong commitment to ensure a doping-free sport and supports the policy for in- and out-of-competition testing in compliance with the WADA code.

The Executive Committee unanimously approves the proposed marketing strategy to further collaborate with major International sports actors in order to further explore the immense untapped market in terms of social media, TV rights, e-commerce, advertising and sponsorship.

As AIBA celebrates 70 years since its inception, the Rio Olympic Games boxing competition looks set to be one of the strongest in its history. The 36 women boxers will build on the pioneering spirit of those who made the sport’s Olympic debut so memorable at London 2012, while the men’s 250-strong competition, including three pro boxers from non-AIBA organisations for the first time, will be the first without headguards since Los Angeles 1984.